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Now for the technical stuff ......Ahead is my Equipment list :

(dont worry about understanding a lot of the following, if you like, just consider that my equipment is the top of the line), or, take the following specifications to any professional sound, music shop and show them this info and they will tell you I have top of the line equipment.)

For smaller gigs : 2 (TWO) USA made Peavey SP2 TI heavy duty DJ speakers (with Titanium Horn Drivers ) and 15 " 8 ohm sub drivers. (These speakers CAN NOT be placed upon conventional weak speakers stands, they are too massive and heavy, unlike the small plastic powerless speakers that most other DJ's use today. My speakers have to be placed upon stable heavy duty speaker pedestals.). For these speakers I use an American Audio VLP 1500 Power Amplifier (with specs similar to top of the line Crown Amplifiers). The VLP 1500 puts out 500 watts RMS into an 8 ohm load (These speakers can handle over 500 Watts RMS (easilly)--- good for 350 plus people+)

OR, for larger gigs : --2 (TWO) JBL JRX 125 (or also known as JRX 225, a newer model) HIGH POWER SPEAKERS (with Titanium Horn Drivers ) and two 15 " 4 ohm sub drivers. 2000 Watts Peak Power !). For the power amp I use a Crest CA9 power amp (Puts out 900 watts RMS into a 4 ohm load), Crest power amps are top of the line. (These speakers can handle a Massive 1000 Watts RMS easilly --- good for 500 plus people)

(Understand that a lot of power does not necessarily translate into wildly high volumes, it means a much more clear and pleasing High Fidelity sound at a lower volume level (better bass, mids and hi end) . Most DJ's have to blast thier sound systems, they think, to try to get a more clear sound. That's because their sound system is lacking in power output/fidelity, and they get distortion as a result and that translates into being highly annoying ! Think about how a cheap transistor radio used to sound, that would be their system. . I drive MY system with the proper power levels and suitable volume levels that will be pleasing to your ears. Please see below (*), for a more technical explanation about power level ratings.

Quad core Asus Computer with up to date Windows 10 and separate 14" monitor (I DO NOT use a Laptop as a primary source, like most other DJ's use, as they tend to overheat)

Virtual DJ Eight (8) Software which is specifically designed to work flawlessly in Windows 10.

Behringer 1002B multichannel studio mixer

Bellari RP562 dual tube stereo sonic exciter

GLI SP 400 multiband sound exciter processor

1 Eliminator Swarm DJ light

1 Mini Kinta DJ Light

1 60W 8-LED 4in1 RGBW Light Spider Moving Head Stage Lights

Strobe light and control

Light stands, ext cords, mics and etc.

As already mentioned...1000s and 1000s of music selections from the 40s up to and including todays best music. I can specialize in oldies also. Nowadays, when in a nighclub, or for the younger crowds, i mix classic modern EDM (Electronic Dance Music), Radio EDM, House music, Reggaeton, Caribbean Island and more, and if someone asks for disco from the 70s or any oldschool tune from the 1960s to the 2000"s, i will play it (Almost all my tracks are remastered or Remixed copies of the tune). I even have some tunes that are mixable (as House Music)from the 1960's/70s, but my specialty is Current Modern House and EDM Music. I also can mix radio friendly music. For private mixed age group parties and for the mature audiences, I mix music going back to the 1940s. Ive recently done Many gigs at private and public parties, weddings and other gatherings and i am best known for the Absolute Best in Dancable Music. Before all gigs, I work with those who organize the gathering to take note of all music requests that will be played during the gig.

Note : Some pictures of this equipment can be seen below :



About Wattage on a DJ's System.... Most all DJ's either tell tall stories about the speakers and amplification they use on their systems. This is probably due to not being technically schooled or inclined. Allow me to explain what happens here with a profesional reference to specifications and a typical system example. I have been schooled as an Electronics Technician and have worked in this field for over 40 years and so I feel I can be a suitable authority on this subject.

First off, lets talk about sound pressure and Loudness and volume. Understand that a lot of power does not necessarily translate into wildly high volumes, it means a much more clear and pleasing High Fidelity sound at a lower volume level (better, more Full bass, mids and hi end) . Most DJ's have to blast thier sound systems, they think, to try to get a more clear sound, or otherwise to obtain the bass, mids or trebles that are lacking. That's because their sound system is lacking in power output and they turn the volume up, causing the amp to "Clip" the sounds going to thier speakers. This greatly effects fidelity, as they get distortion as a result and that translates into being highly annoying ! Think about how a cheap transistor radio used to sound, that would be their system. I drive MY system with the proper power levels and suitable lower volume levels that are matched to the speakers and that will be pleasing to your ears.

Heres an example of a DJ in my local area telling of his systems speaker's wattage : The base Package includes 2 JBL prx712 1500 watt pro audio speakers.

OK, now ...notice that the wattage given is not defined. The novice reading this will not understand that the wattage mentioned in this sentence is what is known as "Peak power level". It is not the standard Professional "RMS" or root means squared power level. RMS power levels are used by professionals. Another thing...these JBL speakers are Powered. In other words, they have a built in power amp. This means that JBL has provided a power level that the speaker can handle without burning or botteming out. It does not give details about what the built in power amp is really delivering to the speaker. Although JBL is usually clear and concise with profesional specs, here its a guessing game as to what the built in amp is actually delivering. This is why it is ALWAYS best for a DJ to have Separate amps and speakers that are properly matched and that the DJ really understands the differences in power ratings and matching speakers to power amps. We only use Separate amps and speakers.

See ahead, Ive provided a professional webpage about the specs on the JBL prx 712 speaker (The speaker in question used by another DJ): jbl SAYS : JBL PRX712 : RMS Power rating 750 watts, Peak power rating : 1500 watts. (You can see that HERE, peak power listed is about double the RMS power) And with most DJ's, this is why they might list Peak power level instead of RMS level. It looks more powerful, thus fooling the novice into believing that the DJ has the more powerful system. THIS IS DECEPTIVE TO SAY THE LEAST ! From The Crutchfield webpage :

Press here to go to this page

We use JBL JRX 125 (or also known as JRX 225, a newer model).

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To add even more confusing professional info about power ratings : (Program, Continuous, Peak, RMS) :

1) Program Power rating is twice that of the Continuous, and the Peak rating is four times that of the Continuous. . 2) Let's say that the loudspeaker is rated at 500 Watts Continuous (Or 500 Rms Watts, see below). That would then be 1000 Watts of Program Material, and 2000 Watts of Peak Power handling 3) The only time "Watts RMS" *should* be different than "Continuous Average Watts" is when the phase angle is not zero degrees, but in audio, the phase angle is not usually a consideration when specifying power. 4) SO, "RMS Watts" would be the same as the average power which is the same as the effective power which is the same as the Continuous Power. (So, RMS Watts = Continuous Watts)

As an example...Lets look at an E1004 Yorkville speaker : Since the Yorkville's Program Power =1000 Watts, the Continuous Watts would be 500 Watts (1/2 the Program, as explained in # 1 and 2 above). The RMS Watt rating would = the Continuous Watt rating (as explained above in #3 and #4 above). Given : RMS Watts of a 1500 American Audio amp = 750 Watts into 4 ohms. The Yorkville E1004 speakers are 4 Ohm. And since : (Generally) the average user should probably have an amplifier as least as big as the Continuous rating of the loudspeaker, but probably NOT more than the Program rating.

So, the Continuous (RMS) power on the (4 Ohm) Yorkville speakers would be 500 Watts (because the Program power is rated at 1000 Watts). And the RMS Power of the amp is 750/4 ohm, so the amplifier is as least as big as the Continuous Power (500 Watts) of the loudspeaker, and NOT more than the Program rating(1000 Watts). In the end, DJ's should always list power as either RMS into the speakers Ohmage or Program power, and NOT peak power.

The DJ, above, in this example states a peak power rating because they probably dont know the difference, or are trying to impress a novice into believing they have the highest power rating ! Both reasons are ridiculous or inmature and shows how some people do deceptive and or misleading business !

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